Wednesday, 6 October 2010

Poverty and riches

I heard this story in church on Sunday. It made me laugh, and then it brought tears to my eyes. I wanted to share it with you.

A man who had grown up in Uganda was visiting a school in an affluent area of England. He asked the class to write a story about being poor. One girl wrote a story which began,
The family was ever so poor. The little girl was poor, the mummy was poor, the butler was poor, the maid was poor, even the dogs were poor!
The Ugandan man spoke to the little girl. He told her that when he was growing up, his family was so poor that he didn't own a pair of shoes until he was 18 years old. When he turned 18, he had the opportunity to go to university. At that point his father bought him a pair of shoes to go to university in.

The little girl said, "Do you mean you had a father who lived at home?"

Poverty is relative. I'm fortunate that we are not badly off. We are able to eat well, to take holidays, to give our children opportunities and to indulge in our hobbies. More than that though I am so rich in love - I am loved by my friends, my family, and especially by my husband and children - and I am loved by God. I am rich indeed. This story has helped me to remember how blessed I am.

This is my post for the 6th day of Blogtoberfest - 6 days and still on track!

17 comments:

Liberty :) said...

Great post and very inspirational xx

Deb said...

I love this post, Mel. It speaks to me on a level that I can't really share in a brief comment on your blog. In a nutshell: my dad wasn't around much, and it meant that my mom had to struggle with money - the majority of the time I was growing up. But I am so grateful for the lessons learned, and the love that surrounded me (and still does) during the process. xo

Enjoy the Ride Today! said...

It is relative, isn't it. I always tell my kids to always try to look at a situation from someone else's perspective. It's so hard to "teach" but once you can, it really opens up your eyes. Great post!

scrappyjacky said...

Lovely post,Mel....very thought provoking.

Ruth said...

A lovely post to read after a difficult day. I am a great counter of blessings. x

Maria Ontiveros said...

Very nice post Mel. I keep reminding myself that being around for my kids is really important, even when they are driving me crazy!
Rinda

Scrappi Sandi said...

A lovely & 'never out of date' moral story! As you know I am a great advocate of counting blessings daily!

Looking at it from a slightly different angle...I have family members, who while very generous with gifts & money, never take the time to visit. They will never understand how one visit would mean more to all of us than all the material gifts they send our way!!

Denise said...

A lovely post,just that one line at the end speaks volumes..x

Kirsty.a said...

thanks for sharing this - we all a reminder sometimes to recognise our wealth

Beverly said...

Thanks for sharing this story, Mel, I had never heard it. I, too am so richly blessed, and the greatest blessings are the ones that are not material :)

The Creative Beast said...

Great story, or should I say parable? It is easy to forget how rich we are in our "ships" - relationships & friendships and I agree with Scrappi Sandy that generous gifts are nothing to connecting on the human level...

Thank you for sharing this - it's a reminder I needed =-)

Clair said...

I was actually talking to my dad about this very thing over the weekend. We were never a 'well off' family but I never felt as though I missed out on anything because I was surrounded by a family I loved.

Karen said...

Wonderful post, Mel!

Amy said...

I can clearly remember a point in my life when I realised that I have everything I need - thanks for the reminder in this post :-)

Rachel B said...

Thanks for sharing this Mel, every so often we all need little reminders as it is so easy to take every thing for granted isn't it? :)

furrypig said...

thank you for sharing this Mel and thanks even more for the reminder of what really makes us poor xxx

Lizzie said...

Thank you for sharing this story, Mel. It did make me stop and think. And count my own blessings.
I'm going to show it to my DS. I think he should read it too...